General questions

WHAT DOES BEA STAND FOR/MEAN:

The brand name BeA is made up of the first letters of Johann Friedrich Behrens’ last name. Behrens founded the company in 1910 in Hamburg and subsequently moved it just outside of Hamburg to the town of Ahrensburg. BeA stands for Behrens Ahrensburg. To find out more about BeA’s history click here.

WHERE CAN I BUY BEA TOOLS AND FASTENERS/ HOW DO I FIND A SERVICE CENTER:

In the US and Canada, BeA’s products are sold and serviced through authorized distributors. Please contact the BeA office in Greensboro, NC at 336-510-4232 or email us at info@us.bea-group.com to be connected to a distributor near you.

In the rest of the world, BeA is either available through our own direct sales force and/or authorized dealers. Please visit the contact page to get in touch with the BeA office in your region. If your country or region is not listed, please contact BeA’s export department.

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE 71/16-421 AND 71/16-401 TOOL?

Either of these German-made staplers accepts BeA 71 series staples (22 gauge, 3/8” crown) up to 5/8”. Both are well-suited for all upholstery applications and have become the benchmark in the industry due to their durability, and consistent fastening results. The 71/16-401 is the more traditional tool; the 71/16-421 is the evolution of this tool and features a longer 1” nose, with improved sightlines for even more accurate fastener placement. The trigger-handle of both tools is different, with the 71/16-421 offering a larger trigger with rounded corners for more comfort. The 71/16-421 also has a bigger rear-magazine guard which is rounded and thus allows the tool to be closed with the palm of the hand more comfortably. We have found that it is ultimately the operator’s personal preference when it comes to choosing the right BeA upholstery tacker.

I AM LOOKING FOR A FASTENER BUT CANNOT FIND IT ON BEA’S WEBSITE:

While we focus on genuine BeA products, such as BeA 71 or BeA 14 series fasteners, we also offer a variety of other commonly used fasteners. Contact your local BeA office for availability.

HOW DO I FIND THE RIGHT FASTENER TOOL COMBINATION FOR MY APPLICATION:

Use the option to sort tools by application on this website as a general guideline. Filter down further by maximum leg length and fastener size. Contact your local BeA office or distributor for further assistance.

WHAT DO BEA ARTICLE CODES MEAN:

BeA’s article codes for pneumatic tools and staples indicate the following.

For tools, the article code indicates the type of fastener the tool accepts, the maximum length the tool can fire and the model designation. For instance a 97/16-407 accepts a BeA 97 series staple up to 16mm (5/8”). The 407 indicates the tool model.  Letters after the model number indicate special models or features such as S for safety/work-contact, L for long-magazine, A for automatic trigger valve.

For staples, both the series and the leg length are part of the article code. For instance a 71/12 is a BeA 71 series staple with a leg length of 12mm (1/2”). The letters after the digits indicate the material or finish such as NK for galvanized, or SS/NR for stainless steel. Therefore a 71/12 staple would work in all BeA tools that begin with 71 and allow a maximum leg length of at least 12mm (1/2”), such as 71/16-421.

Carton closing tools also follow this general designation, and also provide details about the mode of operation. The last letter followed by the numbers indicates the type of fastener and maximum leg length. A MT-C18 would therefore accept a C type staple up to 18mm (3/4”). The first set of letters indicate the type of tool:

MT: Manual tool (no air connection required)
AT: Air tool (requires pneumatic connection)
MT/AT-PB: post bottomer (upright post to close bottoms of boxes)
MT/AT-SB: side-arm bottomer (side arm for shallow boxes, trays)

MY APPLICATION REQUIRES THE TOOLS TO BE MOUNTED AND FIRED REMOTELY, IS THAT POSSIBLE?

BeA offers mounting brackets and remote fire valves for almost all BeA tools, however the recommended solution for all mounted and repetitive fastening applications is the installation of a BeA Autotec tool. These German-made tools are custom-build for each individual application and offer the benefits of industrial grade design, with high load volumes and firing rates of up to 10 shots per second. The tools can be fully integrated into the production process through PLC control and supervision. To find out more, visit this section of the website  and contact your local BeA office.

HOW DO I FIND THE RIGHT FASTENER FOR MY TOOL, THE RIGHT TOOL FOR A FASTENER:

Please see above under “what do BeA article codes mean” Contact BeA to discuss interchange options.

HOW DO I DETERMINE A SPECIFIC STAPLE SIZE/WHAT IS CROWN WIDTH, LEG LENGTH, AND GAUGE?

The keys in understanding a staple are crown width, leg length and gauge.

By crown width we mean the measurement of the “bridge” that connects the two downward legs. For instance a BeA 14 series has a crown width of 7/16”.

As the name implies, leg length indicates the length of the legs on either side of the crown. For instance a BeA 80/12 has a leg length of 12mm (1/2”).

Gauge is the measurement of the genuine wire (before it is formed into band and then into a staple) based on the American Wire Gauge (AWG) and indicates the general thickness of the staple wire being used. The higher the gauge number, the thinner the staple. For instance a BeA 71 series is a 22 gauge staple, frequently used to attach upholstery fabric. A much thicker staple is used in constructing pre-fab homes is, such as the 15 gauge, BeA 180 staple.

A last determinant is the actual wire size of the staple: the thickness and width of the finished product.

WHY DOES MY PNEUMATIC TOOL SPARK WHEN IT IS FIRED:

This is a normal occurrence, especially with larger tools and nail tools. It is caused by the metal to metal contact of driver blade and fastener and is no reason for concern.

DO I NEED TO OIL MY PNEUMATIC BEA TOOL:

It is highly recommended to apply a few drops of oil each day prior to using a BeA pneumatic tool. A few drops applied through the main air-connection are sufficient for proper operation. BeA recommends the use of standard pneumatic tool oil. A few drops per day are sufficient; on longer shifts re-oiling mid-day is recommended.  Usually less is more when it comes to oiling a BeA pneumatic tool, as over-oiling can cause parts to get clogged and attract dirt which might cause the tool to skip and operate sluggishly.  The type of oil being used is crucial to proper operation, only use oil specifically manufactured for pneumatic tools, no transmission fluid, WD40 and pneumatic tool oil intended for impact tools and the like should be used as this will cause the O-rings to deteriorate.

WHY AM I ABLE TO DRIVE THE FIRST FEW FASTENERS FLUSH AND THEN FASTENERS BEGIN TO STAND UP:

Usually this is remediated by increasing the volume of air supplied to the tool (not an increase of pressure). The air supply is not sufficient for the tool to adequately complete its cycle, eventually this will lead to the piston-driver assembly not returning to its start position thus affording less drive power. Choose a compressor with a larger or auxiliary air-tank, ensure proper hoses (should be rated for at least 150 PSI) and be as short as possible. The hose diameter should be 3/8”. Check air-system for holes, kinks or restrictions.

WHAT IS THE RECOMMENDED AIR PRESSURE FOR BEA PNEUMATIC TOOLS:

The air pressure depends on the type of tool and the application. Consult the technical specification for each tool on this website to find out more about the appropriate air pressure for each tool. In general terms, the lowest possible amount of air pressure should be used to still drive the fasteners sufficiently and at the desired speeds. The higher the air pressure the more likely parts will wear and break.

MY BEA CARTON CLOSING TOOL, DOES NOT PROPERLY CLINCH/BEND THE FASTENER EVEN THOUGH I AM USING THE CORRECT BEA STAPLE:

All hand-held BeA carton closing tools for stick (such as A and C series), and roll staples (such as SWC7437, GR and RR) can accept different leg lengths. The tool’s model designation indicates the acceptable fastener to be used. For instance the BeA MT-A18 is a manually operated tool for BeA A type staples up to 18mm (3/4”). While this model accepts both BeA A5/8 and A3/4 staples, a small adjustment might be necessary in order for the fasteners to be clinched properly. When looking at the front of the tool, you will see an indicator with the letters “S” and “L”, this indicates for which of the two fastener lengths the tool is currently set to. When placing the tool on a table and looking at it from the front, the upper letter (readable) is the current setting. For the MT-A18 “S” (short) would indicate a 5/8” leg and “L” (long) a 3/4” leg. To change the setting: turn the tool upside down, loosen the Allen screw in the center of the nose, turn the S/L screw to the correct setting, and tighten the Allen screw.

The settings for all BeA carton closing tools are:

A series (1 3/8” crown)

C series (1 ¼” crown)

Tool type

“S”

“L”

Tool type

“S”

“L”

MT-A18

A5/8

A3/4

MT-C18

C5/8

C3/4

MT-A22

A3/4

A7/8

AT-C18

C5/8

C3/4

AT-A18

A5/8

A3/4

AT-A22

A3/4

A7/8

GR series (1 1/4” crown-roll)

RR series (1 1/4” crown-roll)

Tool type

“S”

“L”

Tool type

“S”

“L”

CT-IC-1823

GR1  5/8

GR1  3/4

CT-IC-1819

RR1 5/8

RR1 3/4

CT-IC-2223

GR1  3/4

GR1 7/8

SWC 7437 series (1 1/32” crown-roll)

Tool type

“S”

“L”

 

 

 

CT-SC-18

SWC7437 ½” and 5/8”

SWC7437 3/4”

 

 

 

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Pneumatic tool troubleshooting:

GENERAL PRECAUTION:

Always read and understand the safety manual and ensure that the correct tool schematic is used when repairing BeA tools. If you have any questions, contact BeA.Always remove tool from air-supply and empty magazine. Operate at correct air pressure. Wear safety glasses and ear protection while operating a pneumatic tool. When opening the tool, we recommend to also inspect other parts such as valve, bumper, driver, piston and O-rings. O-rings should always be replaced as a set. Lubrication is an important factor in the tool’s performance. Use pneumatic tool oil, a few drops every few hours are sufficient.

THE FASTENER IS NOT FULLY DRIVEN:

  • The air-pressure might be too low.
    Increase air-pressure, consult specification sheet/manual for maximum permissible air-pressure. DO NOT exceed maximum specified pressure as this might damage the tool.
  • Adjust depth of drive on tool.
    If the BeA tool is equipped with a depth of drive adjustment, change to desired level of depth of drive.
  • The tool’s driver blade might be worn or broken.
    Inspect driver-blade and replace if necessary. Consult the schematic to see if the tool is equipped with a driver blade that can be turned over to double the part’s life-cycle.
  • The piston O-ring might be worn or damaged.
    Replace piston O-ring.

FASTENER IS DRIVEN TOO DEEP (COUNTERSINK):

  • The air-pressure might be too high.
    Reduce air pressure. In general the minimum air-pressure is 75 P.S.I. Consult manual or specification sheet for further information.
  • Adjust depth of drive on tool.
    If the BeA tool is equipped with a depth of drive adjustment, change to desired level of depth of drive.
  • The driver blade is too long for the specific application.
    Most pneumatic BeA tools are equipped with a driver blade that protrudes slightly from the nose area to allow the fastener to be countersunk. If this is not desired, carefully grind the driver blade to the desired length. Chamfer the bottom rear edge of the driver blade slightly before re-installation.

AIR LEAKS FROM THE NOSE WHEN TRIGGER AND WORK PIECE CONTACT ARE ENGAGED:

  • The bumper might be worn, split or chipped.
    Replace the bumper.
  • The cylinder might be damaged.
    Check inside of cylinder for wear marks, check for splits or cracks. Always make sure to inspect the top and bottom edges of the cylinder as these are important to maintain a proper seal. Replace as necessary.
  • The piston might be damaged or piston O-ring worn.
    Inspect the piston and (if applicable) piston O-ring. Replace as necessary.

AIR LEAKS FROM THE NOSE WHEN TRIGGER AND WORK PIECE CONTACT ARE NOT ENGAGED:

  • The cylinder O-rings might be damaged.
    Replace O-rings as necessary

AIR LEAKS FROM TRIGGER:

  • The bottom trigger valve shaft O-ring might be worn or damaged.
    Replace as necessary.

AIR LEAKS FROM THE CAP OR FROM THE EXHAUST PORT ON THE CAP:

  • The cap of the tool is loose.
    Inspect cap and ensure that all bolts are tightly secured, or if the tool has a screw-in cap ensure proper fit. Also (if applicable) inspect O-ring or gasket. Replace parts as necessary.
  • Worn or damaged O-rings. Inspect and replace as necessary in these areas:
  • Main valve
  • Poppet valve
  • Trigger valve

AIR LEAKS FROM THE EXHAUST PORT ON CAP WHEN TRIGGER AND WORK PIECE CONTACT ARE ENGAGED:

  • The exhaust valve and/or exhaust valve O-ring in the center of the cap might be damaged.
    Inspect and replace as necessary.

THE TOOL CYCLES SLUGGISHLY:

  • The tool might need to be lubricated.
    Add a few drop of pneumatic tool oil into the tool, through the main air connection.
  • The piston Oring might be worn or damaged.
    Inspect and replace as necessary.
  • The exhaust silencer might me clogged or sludged by lubricant.
    Clean or replace exhaust silencer.

THE PISTON-DRIVER ASSEMBLY DOES NOT RETURN TO THE FULL UP POSITION AT THE END OF A CYCLE:

  • The air-pressure might be too low.
    Increase air-pressure, consult specification sheet, manual for maximum permissible air-pressure. DO NOT exceed maximum specified pressure as this might damage the tool.
  • The tool’s driver blade might be worn or broken.
    Inspect driver-blade and replace if necessary. Consult the schematic to see if the tool is equipped with a driver blade that can be turned over to double the part’s life-cycle.
  • The piston O-ring might be worn or damaged.
    Replace piston O-ring.

THE TOOL DRIVES FASTENERS ONLY INTERMITTENTLY:

  • The pusher is obstructed, bent or pusher spring worn/broken.
    Inspect, clean pusher and magazine. Replace worn or damaged parts as necessary.
  • Improper of defective fasteners.
    Ensure use of BeA fasteners for best performance. Examine fasteners for possible defect.
  • Piston driver assembly not returning.
    See above

THE TOOL IS JAMMING, FASTENER ARE NOT FEEDING:

  • The tool’s driver blade might be worn or broken.
    Inspect driver-blade and replace if necessary. Consult the schematic to see if the tool is equipped with a driver blade that can be turned over to double the part’s life-cycle.
  • The pusher is obstructed, bent or pusher spring worn/broken.
    Inspect, clean pusher and magazine. Replace worn or damaged parts as necessary.
  • Improper of defective fasteners.
    Ensure use of BeA fasteners for best performance. Examine fasteners for possible defect.

THE TOOL’S MAGAZINE OPENS INADVERTENTLY:

  • The magazine latch is worn or broken.
    Replace as necessary. Inspect alignment of nose as this might cause the fasteners to be pushed back. Re-align nose if possible. Replace if necessary.
  • The magazine locking pawl spring might be weak, damaged or broken.
    Inspect and replace as necessary.
  • The tool’s driver blade might be worn or broken.
    Inspect driver-blade and replace if necessary. Consult the schematic to see if the tool is equipped with a driver blade that can be turned over to double the part’s life-cycle.
  • The tool’s nose might be misaligned.
    Re-align nose if possible. Replace if necessary.

Questions about compressors:

For proper operation and questions about compressors, please consult the manufacturer of your compressor. A few general guidelines include:

WATER BUILD-UP IN COMPRESSOR, HOSES AND PNEUMATIC TOOL:

  • This is caused by natural condensation and might be excessive in cold or humid climates.
  • In cold weather the water might eventually freeze inside the pneumatic tool, causing operational issues
  • The solution is to drain the compressor several times per day and store tools in a heated environment whenever possible.

HOW DO I REMOVE THE WATER THAT HAS BUILD-UP INSIDE MY TOOL/AIR HOSE:

  • The easiest way to remove water from a pneumatic tool is with a blow-gun.
  • Remove BeA pneumatic tool from compressor
  • Blow compressed air with the blow-gun into the air-inlet port until all water has been blown out of the tool

HOW DO I REMOVE WATER FROM MY COMPRESSOR:

Consult your compressor’s manual on how to drain the tank

IS IT ADVISABLE TO USE A DRYING AGENT IN MY COMPRESSOR AND HOSES TO REMOVE EXCESS WATER:

As this might cause damage to the BeA pneumatic tool, it is not recommended.

THE COMPRESSOR OPERATES AND BUILDS UP PRESSURE BUT NO COMPRESSED AIR IS DELIVERED:

Check the pressure-regulator valve on the compressor and ensure that it is set to the desired pressure level

Consult the compressor’s manual for proper operation and possible replacement

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